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In japanese.SE they have basic translation tags.

I think this would be a valuable tool for us.

Visual example

translation tags in action

(Sexy freehand circles!)

How they work

From https://japanese.meta.stackexchange.com/a/1501:

Basic translation tags

You can add # Japanese/# 日本語/# 和訳 and # English/# 英語/# 英訳 header tags at the start of lines to allow for tabbed English translations of Japanese posts.

This should be considered experimental, and may be removed at a later time if it proves not to be useful. However, the answers will be backwards reversible if it's decided this feature should be removed, as they're just standard headings.

For example, the following code:

# 日本語
日本語として表示されるテキストです。

# English
This will display for the English text.

Will be output as:

日本語

日本語として表示されるテキストです。

English

This will display for the English text.

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3

Both the IPA notation, as well as the translation tags are part of an engine that was originally created to display furigana. It has evolved into a script implementing all the features that are particular to Japanese.SE.

The script is being developed and maintained by cypher and is available on github. We would have to ask, if we could adapt and use the script here on Portuguese.SE as well. If yes, we would also need someone willing to maintain the script separately.

Finally, we would need to ask for support from the Stack Exchange team to see if someone would be willing to upload the script whenever it is substantially updated.


The language tabs are being considered experimental on Japanese.SE, but since we have a large number of questions in both English and Portuguese, we could also decide to experiment and enable them here.

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  • We can adapt and use: the code is under a CC-BY-SA license. If we decide to try it, finding someone to maintain the code should not be too complicated because we have several developers in our community. (I am one; I could have a go at it.) – ANeves Feb 11 '16 at 14:32

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